Odilon by Stacey Clark – Fall 2012 – Puzzle Pieces

Stacey Clark’s Fall 2012 Odilon collection is directly derived from the more confusing bits of David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks.” Inspired by Lynch’s long takes and psychological twists, Clark sought to transpose this same mysterious nature to her own work. The result is highly stylized, with Lynch’s graphic space transferred to prints for dresses and sweaters throughout the collection. Other references to the series included the classic puzzling quotation, “the Owls are not what they seem,” printed on a long sleeve shirt, all orchestrated to contribute toward presenting a secretive girl icon.

view the full collection in our Photo Gallery

story by Chloe Bensahel
photos by Aeric Meredith-Goujon
web editor Rachel Reneé

Stacey Clark’s Fall 2012 Odilon collection is directly derived from the more confusing bits of David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks.” Inspired by Lynch’s long takes and psychological twists, Clark sought to transpose this same mysterious nature to her own work. The result is highly stylized, with Lynch’s graphic space transferred to prints for dresses and sweaters throughout the collection. Other references to the series included the classic puzzling quotation, “the Owls are not what they seem,” printed on a long sleeve shirt, all orchestrated to contribute toward presenting a secretive girl icon.

Clark carried over her variations on stripes from her previous collection, as well as side details on wide-legged pants. The color scheme, ranging from red and black to lilac and white, also referenced Lynch’s Black Lodge concept, yet remained cohesive, presented according to color. Materials were similarly varied, including shearling and wools as well as leather and silk. The red pony hair motorcycle jacket particularly shined on an all-red look.

Though other looks, like her leather mini-dress, were carried from last season, this felt smaller than previous collections. Clark toned down her color variations and kept more consistent cuts and shapes. More sellable in nature, one remarks Clark’s efforts to keep her identity in her work, preserving certain trademarks like stripes and long lengths in a new more wholesale buyer-friendly package. Clark’s collection is symbolic of what every young designer must face in the context of a recovering economy, fighting to preserve her creative license so that she may continue to excite her customers as much as she has in the past.

Disappointingly, none of the models were seen conferring with logs.

designer Stacey Clark

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